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Never asked but still answered!

 
Dear readers,
 
There are always interesting, funny and also curious facts about different areas, which are difficult to accommodate thematically. Nevertheless, we do not want to withhold them from you!
That is why we have decided to introduce a new section, which we would like to present to you today: Never asked but still answered!
 
We hope you will enjoy browsing through this section. Then, in the future, when you're looking for a reason to celebrate, you can casually shake "German Butter Bread Day" out of your sleeve.
If you also have an idea that you would like to share with the rest of our readers, please feel free to write to us at marketing@backshop-tk.de. We are looking forward to your ideas and hope you enjoy reading!

Never asked and yet answered!
Today's topic: Bread
 
We all eat it every day, and we as frozen bakers even earn our bread with it: Bread in any shape or form. Bread has a long tradition in Germany, and with over 300 varieties, there is now an amazing variety here!
However, the main ingredients are always the same: grain, water, salt and a leavening agent such as the classic yeast. Recipe and production are strictly regulated, but bakers are allowed to be creative when it comes to taste, product names and special ingredients.

However, bread is not only delicious and versatile in its use, some ingredients can also play a major role in health. Because of its high carbohydrate content, bread is considered an important source of energy, and whole grain bread has great digestive benefits thanks to its high fiber content. In addition, the whole grain contains calcium, iron, potassium and magnesium. Special ingredients such as quinoa, flaxseed and other so-called superfoods can add even more flavor and nutritional value to a loaf of bread - and it tastes great, too!

History of bread

People began eating grains over 10,000 years ago. First in the form of soup, later as porridge - but even then it was impossible to imagine nutrition without it. Crushed cereal grains in combination with water were baked on hot stone or in ashes to form patties, the forerunners of today's bread. Thanks to the rather accidental discovery of the fermentation process by the Egyptians 2,000 years ago, we now know bread with a loose crumb and crispy crust. The invention of the mill and the kneading machine, as well as the optimization of the baking oven by the Romans, also led to an expansion of the range of products among Central European bakers.

Meaning and rituals

The term "bread" represents both food and nourishment in general, and even livelihood. After all, we all colloquially earn "our bread" and are "in wages and bread". The classic housewarming gift of bread and salt is said to bring wealth, fertility and health to the recipient. The Christian ritual of crossing a loaf of bread three times at the bottom before cutting it is meant to bless the bread and give thanks to God. Last but not least, the "daily bread" is of great importance in prayer.

Days of honor

There are even some special days in honor of bread. On "World Bread Day" or the "International Day of Bread" on October 16, one of the oldest and most important foods is celebrated. The purpose of the day is to raise public awareness of bread's central role in global nutrition. The Madrid-based UIBC (International Union of Bakers and Confectioners) established "World Bread Day" before 2010. However, the exact date is not known.

In Germany, there is also a special day on which the German bakery trade honors German bread culture. The date on which "German Bread Day" takes place varies between late April and mid-May. On this occasion, guild bakers celebrate the diversity of their specialties and invite consumers to join them in celebrating the day.

Last but not least, the "Day of the German Butter Bread" should be mentioned. This always takes place on the last Friday in September, and has been since 1999. The resourceful reader will now realize that this was already last week. So you now have plenty of time to think about which type of bread you would like to celebrate this special day with next year - and if in doubt, just ask us. We are sure to have something suitable for you!

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